Science of Skin

Skin cancer

Wavelengths of both ultraviolet A (UVA 320-400nm) and ultraviolet B (UVB 280-320nm) radiation have been implicated as carcinogens (cancer causing agents), though their methods of action are distinct. The two wavelengths of radiation are able to penetrate to different depths of the skin and hence affect different cells in the epidermis and dermis: UVB radiation is mainly absorbed by epidermal components such as proteins or deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), whereas UVA radiation penetrates deeply into the skin and reaches the lower epidermis and dermal fibroblasts. The extent of their effect also…
Skin cancers are malignant growths (malignant tumours or malignant neoplasms), which usually present on the epidermis (the outer layer of skin), though can occur in other areas of the body such as inside the mouth, nose and on the nailbeds. The three most common forms of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and melanoma. Basal cell carcinoma is the most common (accounting for approximately 75% of all skin cancers), though it tends to grow slowly over a number of years and is unlikely to metastasise…
Solid organ transplantation refers to the removal of living and functioning organs from a donor’s body and then their transfer back into a recipient’s body. Solid organ transplantation involves major surgery and the risk for serious complications, including death. In 2008 in the United States, about 200,000 people were living with a functioning transplanted organ, or graft, while about 100,750 were waiting on the active national transplant list and around 25,100 solid organ transplantations had been performed. In Australia, there were 799 organ transplant recipients in 2009, with 4,285 individuals…
Certain skin cancers can be directly attributed to chronic skin damage from ultraviolet (UV) radiation, while other skin cancers (such as melanoma) are also believed to be the contributed to by this damage. The best way to reduce your risk of skin cancer is to adhere to a regular regime of skin photoprotection (protection from UV and light) before skin is exposed to UV light. Sunburn is only one indicator of skin damage from ultraviolet light, caused by UVB light (in the range of 310-280 nm). More recently we have…

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